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Is there a better industry to be in than the beer industry? Who has never felt a feeling of pleasure in drinking the first sip of a cold beer? A study has shown that just the taste of beer triggers the release of dopamine in the brain. Scientists have long known why alcohol triggers such waves of pleasure. Drunkenness releases dopamine, a neurotransmitter that is associated with other activities such as sleep or sex, and is involved in the reward pathway within the brain. However, a new study suggests that for some people, no need to go to the state of intoxication, to feel such a sensation. Just a sip will do.

Looting cakes from bee nests, our ancestors discovered the first sweetener condensed honey. This substance brought to their physical body an energizing element they loved and their organization required it to support them in their difficult wildlife. They soon realized that the sugars could be turned into alcohol in contact with air and water and the resulting brew brought joy and dream. So they made mead, the first intoxicating drink and the discovery of drunkenness that invaded when they abused it. Since the advances of science in the field of food hygiene, nutritionists have not failed to point out the negative effects of alcohol abuse in our bodies, while recognizing the benefits of limited use. Obviously drinking too much beer will have a negative impact on our health and fitness. Some people often resort to dietary supplements like garcinia cambogia to lose the extra weight, but it is not enough. If you want a slim body, only drink beer in moderation. As Mead and perhaps at the same time beer itself was probably discovered by accident from an abandoned rain-soaked barley crop having germinated yeasts in the air which would have fermented and produced the beginnings of this alcoholic beverage. The beer was probably made in the early crops of barley and harvested in Mesopotamia in 8000 BC. As for historical evidence of its existence as a cereal crop, they were found in the province of Sumer ( Mesopotamia in southern Iraq ) and date to the IVth millennium BC as the staple diet of the time in these regions. Beer was also used in trading due to its high value and merchants made good profits from it.

Ale which name comes from Ceres vine ( Ceres was the goddess of the harvest ) was the name given to this drink before the beer that King Charles VIII returned in his edict of 1489, on the occasion of the establishment of a new tax (the name came from the Dutch bier). This drink made with barley and meslin (mixture of wheat and rye) was used since antiquity as fragrance with herbs like mint. It was the drink of the common people of the north and north-east of France. That would be the Gauls who invented the barrel to the store and were fermented in a lightning (large fixed barrel). The introduction of hops in beer dates from the 12th Century when a German Benedictine nun Hildegard of Bingen discovered the aseptic and conservative virtues of hops ( and bitterness ), allowing beer to better maintain and replace his other tasty additions. Before this discovery, the Romans believed that hops sucked sap from trees on which it climbed, calling it small wolf. As its scientific name, Humulus lupulus : Humulus comes from Slavic Schmeli designating the use of hops for making beer in the Caucasus. In France, the hop vine is also known as the North Vine and some authors argue that it would be called sarsaparilla in some areas.

Apart from its origins lost in the mists of time, we should point out that from Babylon, the Egyptians of antiquity had a national drink of beer dedicated to Osiris, god of the sun and Isis, the goddess of barley. From Egypt, it will spread to Spain and Rome and Greece. It will later become the Korma of the Gauls and the Ale of the Celts. Charlemagne was very interested and encouraged its production. The monasteries of the Middle Ages improved conservation techniques and a refined taste with hops. In 1435 John the Fearless, Duke of Burgundy will require the use of beer to combat epidemics, the water quality being questionable. The English, the Germans, the Scandinavians and the countries of northern Europe will soon make it their favorite beverage. With pasteurization and strict hygiene, yeast will be free of harmful bacteria which improves the taste of beer and its purity. Pils at low fermentation was then developed by the Czechs in the city of Pilsen in the 15th Century. To maintain the temperature, ice brought from the mountains were stocked in deep cellars. The beer was in the past before the current manufacturing techniques a little clearer and closer to a soup of bright beverage wearing white foam that we enjoy now as liquor. We drink in glasses specially designed to pull her blonde or amber colors with the most pleasing effects. Presenting it in glasses with harmonious forms, artistically decorated with evocative names of the soil, the brewers bring us water at the mouth. They are striving to refine their manufacturing techniques and impose strict hygiene rules, especially regarding the quality of water which accounts for 80-90% of its composition.